This is our third episode of our “Terp Tales series” and this time we are going to talk about the unspoken joys of medical interpreting written by German Soto!

 

Enjoy it!

 

“I currently work as an OPI and VRI interpreter from my hometown in Chihuahua, Mexico, where there are not a lot of opportunities to work on-site. I personally don´t have any on-site clients, but I do know that occasionally interpreter services are required when upper management officials come and visit American or Canadian factories that are established here in my city, therefore interpreters in my area rely on companies like Boostlingo for supplemental income.

 

I´ve been an interpreter for  little over 4 years now, this job has been one of the most rewarding jobs I ever had, the feeling that one gets after every call it´s so fulfilling, to be able to bridge the gap between two individuals that speak different languages and being able to make them understand each other not only language-wise but also culturally makes me feel as if I had a superpower.

 

I have found that medical calls are my favorite ones although they do not always have a happy ending. I have always been interested in the medical field and these calls really catch my attention and allow me to do my best since I personally have some medical education. Within these calls, a particular labor and delivery assignment really brings a big smile to my face I have always felt blessed when a newborn cries for the first time and I felt so fortunate to get to witness a new life being born in real time, a miracle.

 

It’s not all bells and whistles–there is always that call that marks your life forever in my case it was a criminal investigation where a child was abducted, I won´t go into details but I often find myself thinking about the whereabouts of that little girl.

But I know this is part of my job and the best part is to help people every day with all my effort!”

 

-German

 

Hello Interpreters!

Here we are with another exciting webinar made just for you!

Join us September 25th at 11am PST for:
Ideas by Interpreters Episode #3–Tune in to chat with Caroline and Jasmin about the code of ethics while practicing cultural sensitivity!

In this episode, Jasmin Gerwien, experienced Arabic Interpreter, will tell us some of her experiences as an Arabic interpreter particularly in a legal/court setting. She will talk to us about her recent work with Syrian refugees settling in the BC Victoria Area and more!

Check out her website for more information on her experiences and services: www.thearabictranslator.com

Jasmin has been interpreting for more than twenty years and has created a career around her passion for interpreting and code of ethics training.

We will delve into how to go about complying with the interpreter code of ethics while practicing cultural sensitivity.

Tune in and register here: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/rt/1563975418514302978

Spots are limited to 100 people, so please REGISTER NOW to RESERVE YOUR SPOT for this exclusive event!!

After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the Webinar and auto add to your Calendar so you don’t miss out!
PLEASE NOTE: if you’re not available at that time, proceed with the REGISTRATION to our event so we can send you an email with the recorded webinar!

We look forward to seeing you next Tuesday, September 25th at 11am Pacific Standard Time!

If you have any question, please send an email to [email protected]

This is our second episode of our “Terp Tales series” and this time we are going to talk about the humanitarian side of Interpreting written by Ahmed Noor!

 

Enjoy it!

 

“Being bilingual is something that many people are not blessed with and when you have such a blessing you are open to many doors and communicate easier with more people. Some research shows that speaking more than one language will give you a better attention span and it will also increase your multi-tasking abilities as your brain will be open to analyze more information more easily. At the same time using this blessing with something like interpreting could help you to develop in many ways as you will be constantly open to learning new things.

 

I believe that there is much need for interpreters in the Somali community as it is known there are many Somali’s who has emigrated outside the country for the last two decades. For most of the first generation immigrants, it was harder for them to adapt to their new environment and learn a new language, but at the same time it was kind of a good thing for the children as if we look closely most of the second generation Somali diaspora are considered bilingual as it is easier for them to speak both their Somali language and the language of the place that they grew at. The reason behind this is that culture and heritage is very important for the Somali people, therefore you see them very connected to their original language at least inside the house. That has shaped me and played a significant part in my life as I was able to speak three languages from a young age as I was speaking Somali at home and Arabic and English at school, it could be confusing at the beginning but as a young child it is very easy to learn.

 

That simple fact made me find myself as an interpreter from a young age and I believe it’s the same case for a lot of interpreters, as you will have to sometimes go with a friend or a family member who could only speak their native language and help with speaking and interpret for him or her for most cases. Although I am working as a professional interpreter, but I have always felt like the humanitarian aspect has more influence on the job as most of the time as an interpreter most of the work involves helping another person which could have a positive impact on the interpreter himself, as the satisfaction of knowing that you had helped someone with your knowledge and made their day easier is priceless and it could change you as a person in many ways and at the same time it could develop your personality in a good way.

 

At the same time I can’t neglect that there are many problems that interpreters in the Middle East and East Africa face as there is no big representations of interpreters in the Health sector and the Government offices, but more and more people are being open to this sector and I believe that with the use of Information technology it could be easier for more people to be helped, and a lot of the gap could be filled.”

-Ahmed

 

We’d like to share with you some “behind-of-scenes” of our Interpreter Community.

This is the first episode and Francisco Pimienta just opened up the stage!

 

“As of 2017, the number of international migrants worldwide stood at almost 258 million (or 3.4 percent of the world’s population), according to UN Population Division estimates. What does this mean to the language industry? Let’s say it could translate into business opportunities, professional development for qualified linguists and a demand for more language services in a wider variety of language pairs.

In the United States where millions of Limited English Proficient (LEP) people reside and the infrastructure, legal regulation and language access has been established so that to everyone regardless of their national origin receives the healthcare they need or legal assistance in their language they prefer, there are still some gaps in coverage that are could be unacceptable and should not happen in our revolutionizing era of technological improvement.

We might think this is impossible to happen since by law according to Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 (42 U.S.C. §2000d, et. seq.). Failure to provide linguistically-appropriate services has been interpreted by the Supreme Court to be discrimination on the basis of national origin under such Title.

Recently while interpreting for a Health Insurance Plan through which I was providing my interpreting services, an LEP patient and I were connected to a Primary Care Provider’s office so that she could establish care for her and her husband, but the Care Coordinator from the Health Plan had to remain on hold on a conference call with the receptionist, since the office did not have an interpreter or anyone that spoke the LEP’s language available to take down the information in order to schedule an appointment.

Surprisingly, the receptionist told the patient that since they did not have anyone who spoke her language in their office and all of the providers only spoke English, the patient would have to bring someone to assist her communicate with the Physician. The female LEP replied “I have a 13-year-old daughter who may be able to assist me interpreting at my medical appointment”, the receptionist gladly replied (as if she had finally had been enlightened with an answer for a very complex Calculus problem) “wonderful, this will really make things much easier for you and for us, but make sure to bring your daughter to all of your medical appointments, otherwise we would not be able to understand each other.”

Since the Health Insurance Plan Care Coordinator was still on the line listening to the conversation, she immediately intervened and explained to the Clinic staff member that it may not be appropriate for the patient to have her teenage daughter help her with her language needs, and offered the LEP to search for a different provider in the area that would have the ability to assist her in her preferred language.

The explanation we received from the Clinic staff was shocking, in fact, due to the lack of language services providers in the remote area of Kentucky, they did not have access to an interpreter and there was not much they could do.

Let’s hope that within the near future with the assistance of new platforms and technologies language assistance can get to every single corner of the country and not jeopardize the life of a human being for deciding to live in a rural area where language access is still limited to a certain extent.”

 

– Francisco