Hello Interpreters!

We have a very exciting feature being added to our platform that we would like to share with you…

Conference Calling is here!!!

To be able to take conference calls, you must go through this training, so please register below for a Conference Calling Training Webinar.

This will enable you to offer conference calling and receive a higher volume of calls!

 

Date and time:

Tuesday, October 30, 2018

11:00 AM – 11:30 AM PST

REGISTER HERE: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/1649853875552886018

 

After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the Webinar and auto add to your Calendar so you don’t miss out!

PLEASE NOTE: if you’re not available at that time, proceed with the REGISTRATION to our event so we can send you an email with the recorded webinar!

If you have any question, please send an email to [email protected]

Thank you all!!

Hello Interpreters!

As we announced last week… Here we are with another exciting webinar made just for you!

Join us October 23nd at 11am for Ideas by Interpreters Episode #4–Tune in to chat with Caroline and Francisco to talk about the International Medical Interpreters Association (IMIA), a great opportunity for medical interpreters to advance the interpreting career, Code of Ethics and Standards of Practice.

We already had a pre-registration last week and spots are limited to 100 people, so please REGISTER NOW to RESERVE YOUR SPOT for this exclusive event!!

Tune in and register here: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/rt/1563975418514302978

In this episode, Francisco Pimienta, Senior Medical Interpreter, will talk about the International Medical Interpreters Association (IMIA) and his role as Mexico Chapter Representative. IMIA is the oldest and largest medical interpreter association in the world. While representing medical interpreters as the experts in medical interpreting, membership to the IMIA is open to those interested in medical interpreting and language access.  For more information about IMIA visit: www.imiaweb.org/

IMIA is currently looking for a Mexico Chapter Vice Chairperson, Francisco will talk to us about this great opportunity for medical interpreters to advance your interpreting career, Code of Ethics and Standards of Practice.

After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the Webinar and auto add to your Calendar so you don’t miss out!

PLEASE NOTE: if you’re not available at that time, proceed with the REGISTRATION to our event so we can send you an email with the recorded webinar!

We look forward to seeing you next Tuesday, October 23nd at 11am Pacific Standard Time!!!

If you have any question, please send an email to [email protected]

Thanks!

VRI: An Effective Communication platform quickly replacing VRS for the Deaf Community

Title I of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) ensures that reasonable accommodation for every person with a disability is a right.
While it’s easy to understand that someone in a wheelchair needs a ramp, or that someone who is blind needs their guide dog, other disabilities can be less obvious. For instance, providing a way for a deaf person to communicate with your business is a right granted through ADA. Your business must satisfy their request for communication.

Video technology has made Video Remote Interpreting (VRI) a possible solution. Not only is this option be available at a moment’s notice, but it is more cost effective for the business paying for the service.

Benefits of VRI

Every deaf person has varying communication needs in different situations. Trying to get a refund at a grocery store may require only a pen and paper. But if a deaf person is rushed to the hospital, they may prefer a live, on-site, American Sign Language (ASL) interpreter.

A live interpreter can cost hundreds of dollars an hour. If you need interpreters 24/7, such as at a hospital, that will be an incredible amount of money per year. A VRI device is only using billable minutes for actual interpreting time. It will save a significant amount of money.

How To Ensure Compliance

The National Association for the Deaf (NAD) and the ADA guidelines have laid out the requirements of VRI communication. In order to provide VRI services, the facility needs to fulfill the following requirements:

Network Demands

  • Tablets, iPads, or mobile computer stations need to be on a secure, non-public, internet connection.
  • Broadband internet is needed for live video streaming.
  • The interpreting company needs to have a reliable network in order to ensure connection.

Device Demands

Sound: Make sure that the device you are using for VRI has clear sound both ways. The interpreter has to hear everything and be able to communicate with the room.

Camera: The camera needs to be able to show the entire upper body of the Deaf person. This is simple in a calm scenario, like a business meeting, be in can be complicated in an emergency. American Sign Language (ASL), contrary to popular belief, is not just a language of the hands and can include arm and lip movements and facial expressions.

Training

Staff need to be trained on the following in order to effectively implement VRI:

  • ADA law and what it means as an employee
  • basic signs that denote deafness
  • operating VRI devices
  • connecting with an interpreter is the most important part of the process.

VRI Shouldn’t Be the Only Option

At the end of the day, technology can always fail. You need to have a backup plan to your VRI equipment to remain in compliance with ADA law. For hospitals and medical offices, they will usually have a contracted interpreting agency they work with. As a owner of a business, if you have an important meeting or event that needs VRI, contact your interpreting provider to see if you can run a test call. They should be more than happy to help. Tests like these can make sure the equipment will work. In the case that there is a breakdown of the equipment, the video becomes choppy, or the Deaf person is not understanding, you have to be ready to provide another solution. Make sure you have a service to call if you need a live interpreter.

Provide Quality Interpretation at A Moment’s Notice

Are you looking for an interpreting agency to partner with that uses VRI?

Do you have additional questions about what your business needs to comply with the ADA?

We are happy to answer any questions you may have!

Feel free to contact us today so we can get you on the right track to clear communication!

 

This is our fourth episode of our “Terp Tales series” and this time we will show you the amazing story of growing up in Haiti and becoming a professional Interpreter by Jean Bosco!

 

Enjoy it!

 

“My name is Jean-Bosco F. , I am fluent in French, Haitian Creole, Spanish and English and I am the proud father of two wonderful children, Christopher 16 and Kimberly. I gave them a nickname which is HAM (Haitian, American and Mexican).

Having been raised in Haiti, my journey into the circle of the family of interpreters started for me at the age of 14 years old. My parents have dedicated their lives working with the poor and the forgotten in the mountains of Haiti. My parents wore many hats in that community. My father was the director of the school during the week, doctor to care for the sick, a judge when there was disagreement between two parties among other title. My Mom would care for the pregnant ladies, the newborn, teaching them how to cook nutritious food and also to read and write.

Many people from different nations had visited us and try to provide resources. There was a language barrier between my parents and them. I begin to find myself in between them with a dictionary on hand interpreting for them. Though, I had not been exposed to protocol or interpreting in the first person, I did my best to convey the message.

Having moved to the United States, I pursued my education in the field of IT for 17 years where I worked as a contractor for the Federal Aviation Administration not knowing that my true calling was to serve as a conduit between two people. Once I figured that out, I began by watching videos about interpreting, the use of first person and the protocol, code of ethics, and culture. I began to practice and study medical terms. Once ready, I applied for my first OPI interpreting job which was in Haitian and French my native tongues. I realized that I love providing that service and began to dedicate more time which began to produce much fruit.

I truly enjoy my profession now because it exposes me to different culture and more importantly having the patience and the ability to meet the LEP at their current level. For example, being a French interpreter does not automatically clear the way to interpret for someone who is from North Africa or from France or Canada. Each of those countries has their own dialect. I have to adjust my French accent according to the LEP’s home country and study the proper way to interpret.

Some of my challenges have been when I have to clean up after a fellow interpreter. Recently, I had to interpret for a lady who did not slept well during the night before and asked her boss to allow her to go home. The company got her an interpreter on the line who interpreted incorrectly what she had to say and that lady ended up in the hospital where she was misdiagnosed. After this fiasco, I was called to interpret for this furious lady. There I had to regain her trust as an interpreter.

Having decided to change my career from IT to now interpreter, I have to say that it has been very rewarding for me. I have interpreted for the Bill Clinton Foundation during the 2010 massive earthquake. I served as an interpreter for Senator Bernie Sanders during a peace conference where multiple countries attended in an attempt to avert going to war with North Korea and most recently for a HBO boxing match in Atlantic City, NJ between Alvarez and Kovalev.

I recognize that I am part of a very important small group of people who has a unique assignment to provide a very important service. Sometimes, I have to interpret a prayer from a chaplain for a dying cancer patient or interpret for a mother who just lost a child. Every call is important and requires attention to details and mutual respect. There will always be a need for an interpreter because the world is a diverse place. No machine at this time can take the place of an interpreter.

At the end, my goal is to make sure that both parties leave satisfied with the service they received.”

 

-Jean Bosco