Hello Interpreters!

We are more than ready to amaze you with the next episode of “Ideas by Interpreters”.

Following some details about this Episode #8:

Summary

What does it really mean to be a freelance interpreter? Do you have your own website, a separate business bank account, and a business license? Should you have them? What are the advantages and challenges of working as a freelance interpreter? What tools do you need to increase your business, clients and income? How can you best market yourself and find clients? (website, social media, professional organizations, networking, etc.). How do you set your prices? How can you keep building and thriving your business? The purpose of this workshop is to answer these questions, provide practical information and share tips to help your business grow and thrive.

Learning objectives

  • Briefly highlight differences between freelance vs. staff interpreter
  • Learn specific tools to market yourself and find new clients
  • How to set prices and stay competitive
  • Highlight the importance of professional development beyond just attending your state conference!

Bio

Judit Marin is a freelance Spanish interpreter, translator, and trainer based in the San Francisco Bay Area. She is an ATA certified (English>Spanish) translator and a California Certified Medical Interpreter. She holds a M.A. in Spanish from U.C. Santa Barbara and a B.A. degree in Catalan Philology from the University of Barcelona. She currently serves as NCTA Vice President and Continuing Education Director. She received the CHIA Interpreter of the Year Award at the CHIA Annual Conference in 2018. Contact her at [email protected] and follow her on Twitter @juditoak.

 

“My journey with languages started when I was very young. When I was growing up, my family and I, we always had a love for languages and cultures. Probably around, 6 years old, we started to learn Spanish. There were many others. Those languages included Spanish, Hindi, Vietnamese and many others. That was only the start.

In the United States, once you reach middle school, most students are required to take a language course as part of their curriculum. At that time, I was obsessed with French. I’d say around 2011 to 2012, I started to get interested into the language Korean. I never would have known it would have taken me so far. As I already had a love and knack for languages, I decided that I would start to learn it. It is now been nearly 7 years since that day.

Looking back, at that time as a young person that was still in high school, I never really considered that Korean or any language would become a career for me. It was just something that I loved, something that made me feel useful, and a contributor to society. Compared to other people, due to physical limitations, I wasn’t able to go abroad or to immerse myself like others were able to do. So, I did what I knew best; I did it all by self-study and hard work. There are many times that I wanted to give up. I’m a bit of a perfectionist I must admit but I kept up with it and now, here I am.

I have experience with both translation and interpretation. And of course, both have their difficulties, but I’d say specifically for interpreting, one of the biggest challenges can be coming to the realization that you are not just interpreting a language. You are a travel guide, a lawyer, a doctor, or maybe even just someone’s best friend. You are what bridges the gap between 2 people, 2 cultures, 2 different life stories. Not only must you know the language well, you must try to feel the emotion that another person is feeling. You’re almost an actor of sorts. It’s much more complex than people may anticipate or expect it to be. I try to imagine if it was me or a family member who needed help. By doing that, it helps me to examine and see how important interpreting really is.

My favorite type of interpreting assignment would be when working with families because family is such a big part of my life. Whether it be a parent teacher conference or someone calling a family member that lives in their home country, those types of assignments bring me much joy and happiness.

After getting connected with Boostlingo, they helped me to see that though I have limitations, I can still do what I love, and I can do it from anywhere in the world. There are remote telephone assignments, remote video assignments, and the platform is so easy to navigate. With Boostlingo, the opportunities are endless. I feel honored to work with them. I never have to feel that underappreciated. The Boostlingo team always does their best to help you in any way that they can and have really helped me to advance my career in ways I never could’ve imagined.

Currently, I am learning 11 languages (for now). I’m still young so I still have a long way to go, but I am excited and happy that Boostlingo will be on this journey with me.”

 

-Adriana

In this episode, Natalya Mytareva, CCHI Executive Director will walk us through the CCHI certification process.
CCHI is the one and ONLY interpreter certification program that is accredited by a third party!!!

Check out their Website: http://cchicertification.org/

Boostlingo is partnering with CCHI to promote the highest quality healthcare interpreting. Both CCHI and Boostlingo aid in the professional development of interpreters. While CCHI offers the only nationally recognized healthcare interpreter certification, Boostlingo promotes CCHI’s mission and offers its technology free to professional interpreters for them to be able to take assignments from the comfort of their own home.

What is CCHI’s purpose?

  • to develop and direct a comprehensive certification program for healthcare interpreters
  • in order to assess their competence and to help ensure quality of interpreting
  • in any healthcare setting and in any modality of interpreting (face-to-face, over-the-phone or remote-video).

Boostlingo is excited to work with CCHI in encouraging the professional development of healthcare interpreters.
We look forward to seeing you on Tuesday, November 13th at 11am Pacific Standard Time!!!

 

REGISTER NOW: https://register.gotowebinar.com/rt/1563975418514302978

“It was providential, in the sense that I wasn’t actively seeking to ‘get into’ the interpretation field.  I had decades of experience in teaching Spoken English to the LEP people, virtually from all over the globe at my own Institute in India. It so transpired that my services were recommended (to a Language Services Provider) by a fellow church-goer when the Courts needed somebody and that, too, for a jury trial, to boot! That was my stepping stone (my ‘baptism’, so-to-speak!) that has now become my profession!

 

It is NOT work, per se, for me because I loooove what I do!

 

It is the sense of fulfillment…a satisfaction that I have contributed my mite in helping to provide the much-needed voice, literally, to the vast sea of the voiceless amongst us. This is because of no inherent fault of their own, except that they do not know (or are not well-versed in) the ‘language-of-the-land’!

In a day’s work, there are umpteen number of instances when one is tempted to speak up and advocate for the helpless (and hapless!) They are unable to appropriately and completely express their thoughts, their issues, their pain, their suffering to the authority figures (the ‘powers-that-be!), be they in the healthcare, legal, community or in any other sphere!

I find it extremely difficult to restrain myself…and to refrain from advocating on their behalf!

There are innumerable tools-of-the-trade, not the least of which is continuing education, whereby one tries to delve deep into the virtually un-ending expanse of language, nuance, accuracy and dedication. These spur one on to better comprehend—and perform—where and when it matters the most!

Social Media Groups and professional associations play a huge part—and pay rich dividends—by way of honing skills, increasing knowledge and, thereby, exposing ourselves to varying and unique perspectives: Watch <> Read <> Listen…>>> and LEARN!

There are multitudinous opportunities in the Legal, Healthcare, Community, Conference/Corporate and other ‘domains’, both on-site and remote! Thus far, much of my own ‘practice’ (!) has been concentrated on-site, though remote (‘off-shore’!) opportunities are rearing up their heads…sort-of like beacons that beckon towards lush and lucrative ‘verdure’!

Relentless competition (sometimes cut-throat, even!) leads to the under-cutting of professional fees (more so by the under-qualified/desperate!)

Many have thrown their hats in the ring in order to make a quick buck! I somehow feel that this profession is—imperceptibly, yet palpably—turning its collective back on the profession and morphing into a business that borders on being unscrupulous at times!

However, it is never too late—for ALL—to try to make amends and put the profession back on track!”

 

-Inder

Hello Interpreters!

We have a very exciting feature being added to our platform that we would like to share with you…

Conference Calling is here!!!

To be able to take conference calls, you must go through this training, so please register below for a Conference Calling Training Webinar.

This will enable you to offer conference calling and receive a higher volume of calls!

 

Date and time:

Tuesday, October 30, 2018

11:00 AM – 11:30 AM PST

REGISTER HERE: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/1649853875552886018

 

After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the Webinar and auto add to your Calendar so you don’t miss out!

PLEASE NOTE: if you’re not available at that time, proceed with the REGISTRATION to our event so we can send you an email with the recorded webinar!

If you have any question, please send an email to [email protected]

Thank you all!!

Hello Interpreters!

As we announced last week… Here we are with another exciting webinar made just for you!

Join us October 23nd at 11am for Ideas by Interpreters Episode #4–Tune in to chat with Caroline and Francisco to talk about the International Medical Interpreters Association (IMIA), a great opportunity for medical interpreters to advance the interpreting career, Code of Ethics and Standards of Practice.

We already had a pre-registration last week and spots are limited to 100 people, so please REGISTER NOW to RESERVE YOUR SPOT for this exclusive event!!

Tune in and register here: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/rt/1563975418514302978

In this episode, Francisco Pimienta, Senior Medical Interpreter, will talk about the International Medical Interpreters Association (IMIA) and his role as Mexico Chapter Representative. IMIA is the oldest and largest medical interpreter association in the world. While representing medical interpreters as the experts in medical interpreting, membership to the IMIA is open to those interested in medical interpreting and language access.  For more information about IMIA visit: www.imiaweb.org/

IMIA is currently looking for a Mexico Chapter Vice Chairperson, Francisco will talk to us about this great opportunity for medical interpreters to advance your interpreting career, Code of Ethics and Standards of Practice.

After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the Webinar and auto add to your Calendar so you don’t miss out!

PLEASE NOTE: if you’re not available at that time, proceed with the REGISTRATION to our event so we can send you an email with the recorded webinar!

We look forward to seeing you next Tuesday, October 23nd at 11am Pacific Standard Time!!!

If you have any question, please send an email to [email protected]

Thanks!

VRI: An Effective Communication platform quickly replacing VRS for the Deaf Community

Title I of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) ensures that reasonable accommodation for every person with a disability is a right.
While it’s easy to understand that someone in a wheelchair needs a ramp, or that someone who is blind needs their guide dog, other disabilities can be less obvious. For instance, providing a way for a deaf person to communicate with your business is a right granted through ADA. Your business must satisfy their request for communication.

Video technology has made Video Remote Interpreting (VRI) a possible solution. Not only is this option be available at a moment’s notice, but it is more cost effective for the business paying for the service.

Benefits of VRI

Every deaf person has varying communication needs in different situations. Trying to get a refund at a grocery store may require only a pen and paper. But if a deaf person is rushed to the hospital, they may prefer a live, on-site, American Sign Language (ASL) interpreter.

A live interpreter can cost hundreds of dollars an hour. If you need interpreters 24/7, such as at a hospital, that will be an incredible amount of money per year. A VRI device is only using billable minutes for actual interpreting time. It will save a significant amount of money.

How To Ensure Compliance

The National Association for the Deaf (NAD) and the ADA guidelines have laid out the requirements of VRI communication. In order to provide VRI services, the facility needs to fulfill the following requirements:

Network Demands

  • Tablets, iPads, or mobile computer stations need to be on a secure, non-public, internet connection.
  • Broadband internet is needed for live video streaming.
  • The interpreting company needs to have a reliable network in order to ensure connection.

Device Demands

Sound: Make sure that the device you are using for VRI has clear sound both ways. The interpreter has to hear everything and be able to communicate with the room.

Camera: The camera needs to be able to show the entire upper body of the Deaf person. This is simple in a calm scenario, like a business meeting, be in can be complicated in an emergency. American Sign Language (ASL), contrary to popular belief, is not just a language of the hands and can include arm and lip movements and facial expressions.

Training

Staff need to be trained on the following in order to effectively implement VRI:

  • ADA law and what it means as an employee
  • basic signs that denote deafness
  • operating VRI devices
  • connecting with an interpreter is the most important part of the process.

VRI Shouldn’t Be the Only Option

At the end of the day, technology can always fail. You need to have a backup plan to your VRI equipment to remain in compliance with ADA law. For hospitals and medical offices, they will usually have a contracted interpreting agency they work with. As a owner of a business, if you have an important meeting or event that needs VRI, contact your interpreting provider to see if you can run a test call. They should be more than happy to help. Tests like these can make sure the equipment will work. In the case that there is a breakdown of the equipment, the video becomes choppy, or the Deaf person is not understanding, you have to be ready to provide another solution. Make sure you have a service to call if you need a live interpreter.

Provide Quality Interpretation at A Moment’s Notice

Are you looking for an interpreting agency to partner with that uses VRI?

Do you have additional questions about what your business needs to comply with the ADA?

We are happy to answer any questions you may have!

Feel free to contact us today so we can get you on the right track to clear communication!

 

This is our fourth episode of our “Terp Tales series” and this time we will show you the amazing story of growing up in Haiti and becoming a professional Interpreter by Jean Bosco!

 

Enjoy it!

 

“My name is Jean-Bosco F. , I am fluent in French, Haitian Creole, Spanish and English and I am the proud father of two wonderful children, Christopher 16 and Kimberly. I gave them a nickname which is HAM (Haitian, American and Mexican).

Having been raised in Haiti, my journey into the circle of the family of interpreters started for me at the age of 14 years old. My parents have dedicated their lives working with the poor and the forgotten in the mountains of Haiti. My parents wore many hats in that community. My father was the director of the school during the week, doctor to care for the sick, a judge when there was disagreement between two parties among other title. My Mom would care for the pregnant ladies, the newborn, teaching them how to cook nutritious food and also to read and write.

Many people from different nations had visited us and try to provide resources. There was a language barrier between my parents and them. I begin to find myself in between them with a dictionary on hand interpreting for them. Though, I had not been exposed to protocol or interpreting in the first person, I did my best to convey the message.

Having moved to the United States, I pursued my education in the field of IT for 17 years where I worked as a contractor for the Federal Aviation Administration not knowing that my true calling was to serve as a conduit between two people. Once I figured that out, I began by watching videos about interpreting, the use of first person and the protocol, code of ethics, and culture. I began to practice and study medical terms. Once ready, I applied for my first OPI interpreting job which was in Haitian and French my native tongues. I realized that I love providing that service and began to dedicate more time which began to produce much fruit.

I truly enjoy my profession now because it exposes me to different culture and more importantly having the patience and the ability to meet the LEP at their current level. For example, being a French interpreter does not automatically clear the way to interpret for someone who is from North Africa or from France or Canada. Each of those countries has their own dialect. I have to adjust my French accent according to the LEP’s home country and study the proper way to interpret.

Some of my challenges have been when I have to clean up after a fellow interpreter. Recently, I had to interpret for a lady who did not slept well during the night before and asked her boss to allow her to go home. The company got her an interpreter on the line who interpreted incorrectly what she had to say and that lady ended up in the hospital where she was misdiagnosed. After this fiasco, I was called to interpret for this furious lady. There I had to regain her trust as an interpreter.

Having decided to change my career from IT to now interpreter, I have to say that it has been very rewarding for me. I have interpreted for the Bill Clinton Foundation during the 2010 massive earthquake. I served as an interpreter for Senator Bernie Sanders during a peace conference where multiple countries attended in an attempt to avert going to war with North Korea and most recently for a HBO boxing match in Atlantic City, NJ between Alvarez and Kovalev.

I recognize that I am part of a very important small group of people who has a unique assignment to provide a very important service. Sometimes, I have to interpret a prayer from a chaplain for a dying cancer patient or interpret for a mother who just lost a child. Every call is important and requires attention to details and mutual respect. There will always be a need for an interpreter because the world is a diverse place. No machine at this time can take the place of an interpreter.

At the end, my goal is to make sure that both parties leave satisfied with the service they received.”

 

-Jean Bosco

This is our third episode of our “Terp Tales series” and this time we are going to talk about the unspoken joys of medical interpreting written by German Soto!

 

Enjoy it!

 

“I currently work as an OPI and VRI interpreter from my hometown in Chihuahua, Mexico, where there are not a lot of opportunities to work on-site. I personally don´t have any on-site clients, but I do know that occasionally interpreter services are required when upper management officials come and visit American or Canadian factories that are established here in my city, therefore interpreters in my area rely on companies like Boostlingo for supplemental income.

 

I´ve been an interpreter for  little over 4 years now, this job has been one of the most rewarding jobs I ever had, the feeling that one gets after every call it´s so fulfilling, to be able to bridge the gap between two individuals that speak different languages and being able to make them understand each other not only language-wise but also culturally makes me feel as if I had a superpower.

 

I have found that medical calls are my favorite ones although they do not always have a happy ending. I have always been interested in the medical field and these calls really catch my attention and allow me to do my best since I personally have some medical education. Within these calls, a particular labor and delivery assignment really brings a big smile to my face I have always felt blessed when a newborn cries for the first time and I felt so fortunate to get to witness a new life being born in real time, a miracle.

 

It’s not all bells and whistles–there is always that call that marks your life forever in my case it was a criminal investigation where a child was abducted, I won´t go into details but I often find myself thinking about the whereabouts of that little girl.

But I know this is part of my job and the best part is to help people every day with all my effort!”

 

-German

 

Hello Interpreters!

Here we are with another exciting webinar made just for you!

Join us September 25th at 11am PST for:
Ideas by Interpreters Episode #3–Tune in to chat with Caroline and Jasmin about the code of ethics while practicing cultural sensitivity!

In this episode, Jasmin Gerwien, experienced Arabic Interpreter, will tell us some of her experiences as an Arabic interpreter particularly in a legal/court setting. She will talk to us about her recent work with Syrian refugees settling in the BC Victoria Area and more!

Check out her website for more information on her experiences and services: www.thearabictranslator.com

Jasmin has been interpreting for more than twenty years and has created a career around her passion for interpreting and code of ethics training.

We will delve into how to go about complying with the interpreter code of ethics while practicing cultural sensitivity.

Tune in and register here: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/rt/1563975418514302978

Spots are limited to 100 people, so please REGISTER NOW to RESERVE YOUR SPOT for this exclusive event!!

After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the Webinar and auto add to your Calendar so you don’t miss out!
PLEASE NOTE: if you’re not available at that time, proceed with the REGISTRATION to our event so we can send you an email with the recorded webinar!

We look forward to seeing you next Tuesday, September 25th at 11am Pacific Standard Time!

If you have any question, please send an email to [email protected]