Over the years and leading up to today, there has been many advancements and changes for interpreter services. The demand for interpreting services around the world has increased tremendously, with more people needing interpreting services in industries such as healthcare and corporate.

Today, a staggering 360 million people across the world are unable to hear, so it’s quite obvious there is always room for improvement. In today’s world, hearing aids aren’t at the top of the list anymore as new changes in science, such as interpreter services are being offered and are proposing a variety of progressive techniques. These developments could increase the quality of life for those hard of hearing. In particular, their effect could help millions of people, many of whom have been waiting a long time to finally be able to understand the world around them.

Nonetheless, the technology for interpreter services has grown and changed over the years for the better, and here’s how.

 

The Progress

 

Overtime, the understanding between cultures has progressed tremendously because of technology. Today, speech recognition is quite incredible, and communication barriers are overcome due to amazing innovations. Moving forward, we can expect to find more tools and advancements that change the way we communicate.

Many businesses across the globe now have access to interpreters who are able to negotiate speech barriers. Although over the phone interpreting has been useful for businesses, users have found that this method has become quite difficult to really connect their clients with the interpreter on the other end of the phone. Luckily, newer technology has been able to solve these problems. An even more forward-thinking way of interpretation is video remote interpretation (VRI). VRI is changing communication between healthcare professionals, medical settings, legal matters and other uses in the corporate world.

Instead of having someone present on site, remote interpreters can communicate through video chat at any given time. This includes the added advantages of face-to-face contact.

This is possible via tablets, computers or any smart devices.

How Video Remote Interpretation Is Making a Difference

 

VRI has been the preferred method of interpretation in healthcare, corporate conferences and courtrooms for quite some time now. VRI is gradually making a difference and its modern techniques have clear advantages over their regular counterparts.

These changes are very common in the US health system, and hospitals are using video remote interpretation now more than ever. While some face-to-face roles are now obsolete, others are changing to suit needs. VRI is often common in the conference and diplomatic circles. However, despite their use, barriers to effective implementation were very high.

With the progression in new technology, this has changed a lot.

Some interpreters take part in conferences on site, albeit not in the same room.

These changes are always happening. We must understand and be able to recognize the value of face-to-face interpretation. Pressure to reduce costs while having more access to interpretation will only increase, so it is important to highlight the importance of video remote interpretation. Considering this can reduce overheads while still providing an adequate service, the use for VRI has increased drastically and is incredibly beneficial.

 

Conclusion

 

The field of video remote interpreting is the epitome of how interpreter services have changed drastically and is part of a larger wave of technological developments. These work together to change how we do things in society. The demand for interpretation is always changing and growing.Mobile communications, in particular, have shaped our interactions a lot. These changes have happened very quickly. It’s been 10 years since the rapid transformation of smartphones, but it’s difficult to work out how much this technology has changed our communication. Suffice to say, it has altered how we speak to each other, especially in ways we may never have thought of. This evolution in technology means interpretation is accessible in places that might never had seemed possible.

Interpretation can be expanded in a variety of ways, which helps create more opportunities for those using the technology.

 

 

If you would like to learn about this topic please check this article from TopTal: https://www.toptal.com/insights/distributed-teams/cross-cultural-communication-barriers

 

Video Remote Interpreting (VRI) is a useful and convenient way of interpreting. Video Remote Interpreting provides qualified interpreter services to ensure effective communication by using video conferencing technology to connect and communicate with people who speak a foreign language, at a different location.

Statistics show that 20% of the world speaks English to some level, but what do you do when your put into a situation at work and you encounter someone who cannot speak English all that well? In this situation, which happens quite often, VRI is able to come to the rescue “on the fly” or in real-time within a matter of seconds. .

VRI is much more convenient than in-person interpreting. With the touch of a button, the service provider can find someone who speaks the language needed and from there, they can interpret for them on the spot.  Most often, the individual interpreting will appear on screen. They can also see and hear you. Essentially, it’s like a Skype call where the interpreter Skypes in.

It is most commonly used in a wide variety of settings such as hospitals, schools, mental health care settings, corporate institutions and other workplaces, a technological advancement that has impacted many industries. Let’s take a look at how these industries have benefited tremendously from video remote interpreting.

Healthcare

The use of VRI in the healthcare industry is at high demand. If you think about it, doctors tell their patients very important information, making it an absolute necessity to have a VRI on call at all times. Often, individuals with limited knowledge of English, or deaf individuals, will come to the doctor in need of medical care. Those who do not speak English might be visiting from another country, or are patients who live in the US but haven’t become proficient enough for a conversation at this level. However, doctors must treat everyone who comes through their doors to the best of their ability, and relying on nonverbal cues and not effectively communicating with their patients can be extremely dangerous, especially if the patient is at high risk for something. It’s important for doctors to assess their symptoms to them, and it is important for a patient to know what the doctor is instructing whether it be for a medication or a procedure. Being unaware of what is happening, especially if it involves needles or any other type of procedure, can be a very scary experience.

Additionally, those coping with long term health issues need to be clear on what is happening and the doctor’s plan of action. As such, a VRI interpreter can be a literal lifesaver. By utilizing VRIs doctors can call them on the spot, put them on the screen, and continue treating their patients knowing they are in good hands.

The Legal Sector

In the United States, someone who will be going on trial for an offense with limited English has the legal right to an interpreter, or at least this is heavily implied within three of the Amendments to the US Constitution. This service is even more necessary in immigration hearings. While some courthouses see more immigration matters than others, or have a high population of individuals from another country, many do not employ interpreters on staff because it isn’t always practical.

Imagine hearing cases all day and then having someone come in from Hungary to have their case heard. Hungarian is notoriously difficult to learn, and only 13 million people speak it worldwide. That’s a little bit more than the population of New York City. It’s not likely that a court would employ a Hungarian speaker due to the limited number of those for whom it is their native language.As such, a VRI once again comes to the rescue and is always on hand. They will be able to help have their case hear fairly, without having to reschedule a court date, or effect anything else during this situation.  

Technology

It’s no surprise that the technology industry heavily benefits and relies on VRI.

As many know, technology is rapidly expanding everyday, and new things are being invented and implemented at a fast pace. Technology is often a product of teamwork, and that teamwork can span the globe. You may have inventors in the United States working with a company in Japan liaising with a German company to help the dream come to life.

While translators may help with emails and other written documents, you’ll likely need to speak to each other at some point in real-time. With VRI, you can facilitate virtual meetings. And, if you ever do collaborate in person, VRI can ensure that all of your complex ideas get across to one another so that the product is the best it can be.

Conclusion

These industries are only just a few that take advantage of video remote interpreting everyday in order to accomplish goals or tasks in their workforce. As you can see, some industries need it a bit more than others, as it is necessary to get ideas across efficiently.

If you’re interested in using VRI technology for your business or public service, read our section about the services we offer. Here at Boostlingo, we have qualified and professional interpreters ready and waiting to help you understand others in your field.

Certified Deaf Interpreters (CDIs) are interpreters who have been trained to interpret for deaf patients who haven’t acquired, or are unable to acquire American Sign Language (ASL).

A CDI is either deaf or hard of hearing, and has been certified by the Registry of Interpreters for the Deaf as a professional interpreter.

A CDI’s Role in the Interpreting Industry

Many people assume that all deaf people are fluent in only ASL, however, quite often this is not the case at all.

Depending on the individual’s schooling and their environment, they could have been exposed to ASL, ESL (English Sign Language) or home signs, obviously making it harder to only interpret ASL.

While ASL is the formal language in the deaf community, it definitely has it own distinct syntax and grammar that if you do not know it, will make it hard to interpret.  Which is where the importance of a CDI’s role comes in.

Working as a Team Member

Quite often a CDI works closely with another interpreter who isn’t deaf. This situation can sometimes make communicating a bit easier. Rather than just using a hearing interpreter or CDI working alone, by working as a team they are able to interpret more successfully.

The two literally work as a team. As the CDI transmits message content between a deaf consumer and a hearing interpreter; and vise versa. While this may just seem like shooting messages back and forth, it’s much more than that.

Both the deaf and hearing interpreter obtains the message in one communication mode. Then, processes it linguistically and culturally. Then passes it along in the appropriate communication mode.

However, there are even more challenging situations where the CDI and hearing interpreter will have to work together to understand a deaf individual’s message. Vest within each other to arrive at their best interpretation, and then convey that interpretation to the hearing party.

Working with a Deaf and Blind Individual

What many do not know is that CDIs can not only help the deaf, but also the blind as well. The CDI can receive a speaker’s message visually. Then help relay it to the deaf-blind individual by the sense of touch.

While this process is not easy, it can get done with a little more challenges. The CDI does everything they can to transmit the message in the easiest way possible for the deaf-blind individual.

Working Alone

Not often, do CDIs work as the only interpreter in a situation, but sometimes the situation may occur. In this instance, the CDI is will use sign language or another communication mode that is easy for the deaf individual to understand.

The Benefits of Using a CDI

While having a CDI in an interpreting situation doesn’t always occur, when you do it can be quite beneficial to all parties. Here are a few benefits to using a CDI:

  • A better understanding by all parties
  • Your time and resources are being used more efficiently.
  • There is a better of understanding of linguistic and/or cultural confusion and any misunderstandings.
  • At the end of the interpreting session there will be no confusion, rather a clear conclusion in the interpreting situation.

 

Conclusion

By using a Certified Deaf Interpreter in an appropriate situation, a consumer who is deaf or hard of hearing is more at ease, and is more likely to interpret faster. CDIs are an extremely valuable resource in any event that a deaf patient does not communicate well in ASL and needs an interpreter.

 

Have you ever sat next to an interpreter while they were interpreting something? While their job may “sound” easy, it really isn’t. If you’re bilingual it doesn’t mean you can interpret consecutively and successfully. Try sitting in on an interpreting situation: one sentence comes out, but then the second one is already coming out before you had already even paid enough attention to the first sentence. If you haven’t been through the training interpreters go through you will fall behind very quickly.

Many people who are bilingual, raised by monolingual parents or raised by deaf parents see this as a challenge. This is why you will notice that many interpreters today have some sort of cultural background that has landed them right into the interpreters seat.

Children who were raised by minorities such as immigrants, migrant workers or deaf people have acted as successive interpreters as well as cultural intermediaries between their communities and the outside world for the majority of their life. Despite the fact that upon becoming interpreters they have never gone through extensive training, the natural abilities these people have are quite impressive.

For example, say you come across a young Spanish girl, who before she reached the age of 5 was already interpreting between one language to another. She then, had to learn how to speak German because her family moved to Germany, and then English because her family eventually moved to the United States. In no time, she mastered how to interpret from and to all of these languages for her parents: a phone conversation, in-person conversations, messages, or radio and tv shows. She might have been put into critical situations where she quickly had to learn and develop diplomatic skills when there were disagreements between someone and her parents. While this obviously isn’t the training interpreters go through today, this girl has been slowly training her whole entire life to become a professional interpreter, which is why some of these childhood interpreters will sometimes find themselves, as adults, in the role of professional interpreters after the intensive “training” they have gone through their entire life.

Additionally, professional interpreters must have all the skills of translators, but also all the verbal and cognitive skills that enable them to go from one language to another consecutively and successively. The consecutive interpreter speaks after the source-language speaker has finished speaking. You then have to memorize it, formulate the translation in the target language, and then communicate it, not to mention doing all of this within a matter of seconds.

Interpreters who have grown up speaking one language while listening to another are able to be consecutive and successful interpreters. It’s no wonder so many of them are in this profession. Not only is it easy for them, but also it most likely means something to them, to be able to help others in this way just like they had to growing up. It is no wonder that interpreters, like translators, are considered special bilinguals.

As many know and acknowledge, deaf history month is celebrated from March 13 – April 15 every year. It sits between the month of March and April to highlight some of the key milestones in deaf history between these dates.
March 13, 1988: I. King Jordan named the first deaf president of Gallaudet University.
April 8, 1864: President Abraham Lincoln signs the charter for Gallaudet University in Washington, the first school for the advanced education of the Deaf and hard-of-hearing in the world.
April 15, 1817: The American School for the Deaf in Hartford, Connecticut, opens. It was the first permanent public school for the deaf.
At Boostlingo, we are celebrating deaf history month by spotlighting how Video Remote Interpreting (VRI) is the fastest growing interpreting service for the deaf and foreign language in the United States.

Why VRI for the Deaf?

Video Remote Interpreting provides qualified interpreter services to ensure effective communication to individuals who speak a foreign language, are deaf or who communicate using sign language. VRI uses video conferencing technology to connect and communicate with people at a different location. It is most commonly used in a wide variety of settings such as hospitals, schools, mental health care settings, corporate institutions and other workplaces.

Today, many hospitals and medical providers are required to have effective communication options for patients who are deaf. For deaf people who communicate primarily in sign language, qualified sign language interpreters may be the only effective communication option. Failing to obtain qualified interpreters for medical interpreting can put patients’ health at risk. One way to minimize these risks is to provide a qualified sign language interpreter through VRI technology. Sometimes, a qualified sign language interpreter is always available on-site, or aren’t able to make it in time if the matter is urgent, which is where VRI comes in. Here are a few ways VRI is helping to provide client-focused services for the deaf.

 

The Benefits of VRI for the Deaf

 

Fast Responses in an Urgent Situation

When clients or patients have a need for communication that is urgent, VRI can provide interpreting services within a matter of seconds. For patients or clients who are deaf, it may be hard to find someone who can interpret ASL right on the spot, which is why VRI would come in handy.

Enhanced Accuracy

The visual support associated with Video Remote Interpreting can provide enhanced accuracy for spoken language and American Sign Language (ASL). This enhanced technology can really make it feel as if the interpreter is sitting right in the room with the patient or client.

On-Demand all the Time

Whether the situation is urgent or not, certain situations aren’t planned in advance which means an on-site interpreter will most likely not be available. With VRI allows access whenever needed. 24 hours, 7 days a week, 365 days a year.

Guaranteed Quality of Services

With VRI, you have the benefit of having the option to have interpreters that specialize in specific areas such as (Science, Technology, Engineering, Mathematics, and other specializations). This is essential for a Deaf patient or client to gain an accurate understanding of what is being interpreted. If those interpreters working in these settings don’t have the training they need, the Deaf individual will suffer the fallout. Conversely, when qualified interpretation is taking place, the Deaf individual is able to fully understand what is being portrayed to them.

Interpreter Scheduling

This goes hand in hand with fast responses, in an urgent situation. Rather than a service requester consistently trying to contact individual interpreters over a period of days or weeks, VRI providers can contract with specific deaf service interpreters. This can be especially beneficial when considering the amount of time it takes to locate and schedule interpreters for recurring appointments. Additionally, these interpreters will most likely always be licensed to practice Sign Language interpreting.

The Deaf Person Doesn’t Stand Out

Quite often in settings will the deaf individual be singled out due to have someone walking around with them as their “helper.” With VRI, this doesn’t need to happen. They will have the ability to log on when communication is needed and log off when it is not. The freedom and convenience of VRI is not exaggerated. It enables a level of independence and equal footing with their peers that could not otherwise exist.

 

Conclusion

The enforcement of VRI around the nation is dramatically improving the experience for Deaf individuals and is a giant step in the right direction for everyone involved. In observance of Deaf History Month we at Boostlingo provide VRI technology to our providers deaf or ASL patients/clients. We have seen what VRI can do, how it can benefit everyone involved.

We are excited to bring to you on  Apr 3, 2019 2:00 PM PST: Ideas By Interpreters #16 with Liz Essary–Author of “That Interpreter”

“Liz Essary has over a decade of experience as a Spanish interpreter in a variety of settings, holding staff interpreter positions from 2004 through 2011. She is certified through the Certification Commission for Healthcare Interpreters (CCHI), and through the Indiana Supreme Court Interpreter Certification program. Her graduate work included training to interpret in medical, court, and conference settings.

From 2011 to 2015, Liz served as Language Services Supervisor at Indiana University Health Academic Health Center, where she developed and delivered workshops for interpreters and those who work with them. She has spoken in the U.S., Canada, and Mexico on quality in interpreter services, advocacy for interpreters, and skills-based training for interpreters. An experienced interpreter trainer, she is licensed to teach Bridging the Gap and The Community Interpreter International. Liz currently teaches in the conference interpreting course for interpret2B, a hands-on interpreting program based in Brazil and delivered in the online classroom.”

Spots are limited to 150 people! 

So please, Register NOW to reserve your spot!
Register here: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/4871408654668499971

We look forward to seeing you on Wednesday, April 3 at 2pm Pacific Standard Time!!! 

Barry S. Olsen (@ProfessorOlsen), a professional interpreter, recently prompted a question on his Twitter feed to his followers – “When interpreting a speaker who is confusing and incoherent, have I done a good job if those listening to my interpretation are just as confused and perplexed as those who were listening in the source language?”

 

The responses he received were a variety of different opinions. Some think that yes, the interpreter does his job right even if the speaker is confusing. Others believe no, the interpreter did not do his job right if the speaker was struggling to express himself. Some believe it is the interpreters job to rework information so it is more clear, while others think that if the speaker is confusing and incoherent than it is hard for the interpreter to relay the information effectively. While many opinions can be expressed, what is the right way to go about these problems interpreters are faced with? Which leads us to interpretation standards and ethics and many questions that have been brought up from this tweet by Barry Olsen.

 

The Challenges Interpreters Face

 

Interpreting is one of the main components of language services, but with that comes many challenges interpreters face to promote understanding and communication. Whether the interpreting is done over the phone, Skype or in-person and if it’s for healthcare, business, or legal purposes, new and experience interpreters are likely to face many challenges every once in a while.  

 

Difficulty Hearing the Speaker

 

This is one of the busiest challenges interpreters face, and the situation can develop from only two things. One, in which can be fixed, the audio equipment is not working properly, and two, a problem with the individual speaker.

While audio malfunctions can easily be fixed, a problem with the individual speaker cannot be fixed right away. These problems can be –

 

  • When the speaker speaks too fast
  • When a speaker speaks to softly

 

When interpreters do simultaneous or consecutive interpreting, it is important for them to clearly hear what is being said. They cannot interpret words and sentences that they cannot hear.

 

Culture Awareness

 

Being an interpreter is very demanding. Aside from a high level of proficiency in the source and target languages, another of the challenges interpreters face is that they must be highly knowledgeable of the culture of different countries. So, what if you are but your speaker does not know the language they are speaking in that well? Or, they know it but are not pronouncing words correctly or the way you studied?

 

While this may occur a few more often than it should, the interpreter has to know the differences in how the language is spoken by people from different regions. Speakers will often use local idioms, slang and jargon when they speak, so it is very important for an interpreter to know that or else the job will not get done.


Cultural awareness is another of the many challenges interpreters face. When interpreting another language, the interpreter should not have to use any extra red sources, they should be able to interpret the target language right away.


Interpreters rely not only in their excellent language proficiency but also in their vast knowledge of a different cultures, the cultural connotations of the words spoken, and how the language is expressed in a different culture.
if an interpreter is not entirely knowledgeable in the language, culture or different slangs they should not be interpreting for that specific job.


Interpreters act as a bridge for intercultural communications. It is important to not only interpret the words, but to deliver the source language in the tone of voice that reflects how it normally sounds in the target language.

It is challenging, but interpreters must be quite flexible yet quick in making decisions right on the spot.

 

 

What type of interpreting is it?

 

This can play a huge factor when interpreting. Whether it is Video Remote Interpreting, or in-person, it is important to know what to do when interpreting in that specific industry. When working in healthcare, the interpreters must be knowledgeable, somewhat on the topic. For legal, do not change anything as this can lead to many issues.

 

It is also important to know the patient or the person. Some interpreters will come across mental health patients, that will simply just not make sense because of the state they are in. When this occurs, it is best to hear what they have to say but then explain the situation to the doctor or whoever you are interpreting too. Always explain your side, and make sure everyone knows that something like that would not be your fault.

 

Conclusion

 

In order to determine if the speaker is deliberately confusing or not, interpreters need to come to the conclusion that they cannot do their job effectively. If you cannot hear the speaker, understand the language they are speaking in, or know what to do in a certain industry situation you will not be able to interpret successfully.

 

ideas by interpreters

 

Hi all!

Are you ready to join us for the next “Ideas By Interpreters” Episode #15?

Join Robin and Caroline to talk about the intricacies and cultural differences between spoken language interpreting and sign language interpreting.
Robin has been in the interpreting field for many years and brings to us a unique perspective on the culture of interpretation.

In this webinar we will hear from a multi-talented interpreter who has experience in both spoken and sign language interpreting and can field questions and comments on this fascinating career.

Learn about the differences between spoken and signed language and hear fascinating answers to questions such as: are signed languages universal? are spoken languages universal?
How do sign language and spoken language interpreters differ in their ways of remembering and note taking during assignments?
How do these types of communication vary in simultaneous interpreting settings?

I hope you join us for this webinar and get to be part of a really interesting discussion on types of communication and how interpreter theory and technique varies given types of languages!

Register here: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/2300101756314325763

After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar.
We look forward to seeing you on Tuesday,  March 19 at 11am Pacific Standard Time!!! 

We are just 24 hours away from the CHIA 19th Annual Educational Conference!

 

chia conference

 

The conference will be held at the Hilton Sacramento Arden West, and will begin at 9:00 a.m. on Friday, March 8 and will end at 5:00 p.m. on Saturday, March 9. This year’s conference, CHIA: Forging the Way to a Gold Standard in Health Equity, will be two days of workshops, networking and fun as CHIA celebrates their 19th annual education conference.

 

CHIA is a non profit organization that brings healthcare interpreters, educators and providers together to overcome language and cultural barriers to high-quality care. This conference, will be doing just that, and Boostlingo is excited to support and help teach the interpreter process to the attendees.

 

For more information on where to register for the conference please visit here.  

Boostlingo looks forward to seeing everyone there!

Quite often, are there misconceptions between translation and interpretation. In fact, many come from the fact that people just don’t know exactly what the translation and interpretation processes consist of. The two are very different, yet very similar as well. Both involve taking a message in one language and accurately rendering it in another language as a way to assist communication between two parties. However, they are still very different and too often do people use the terms interchangeably, which only increases the confusion.

 

Interpretation

First off, interpretation is spoken, but it is not a word-for-word translation of a spoken message. It enables real-time cross-linguistic communication either face-to-face, in a conference setting or over the phone. Essentially, this is the process where a person repeats what is said out loud in a different language.

The process of interpreting consists of the interpreter listening to a speaker in one language, grasps the content of what is being said, and then paraphrases his or her understanding of the meaning into the target language.  Interpreters work on projects involving live translation: conferences and meetings, medical appointments, legal proceedings or live TV coverage.

Specifically in the healthcare field is interpreting found the most. Quite often do doctors come across patients who speak a different language then them, which is where VRI (or video remote interpreting) come in handy.

Translation

Unlike interpretation, translation is written. It is rendering text from a source language into a target language while preserving meaning. Translators are given any type of document, and from there, render that material clearly and accurately into the target language.

A good translator must have the ability to write well and understand the culture of the target language. They often use a good library of dictionaries and reference materials, to render material clearly and accurately into the target language. Translators work on any information in written form: websites, print or video subtitles.

 

Boostlingo And Smartcat Partnership

The main difference between the two is the way the information is presented. Many people think that if you can do one, you can do the other. Which is entirely untrue. Translators are not trained to translate orally, and interpreters are not trained to render information onto paper. Interpreters also work in real time, while translators receive a document after it has been written.

Speaking of which, Boostlingo and Smartcat last year announced their partnership to help language service companies and organizations work more effectively between the two domains of translation and interpretation services. The two top cloud-based language platforms plan to team up to integrate and market their services and solutions for collaboration.

Nonetheless, translation and interpretation are both ways of presenting something in a different language, just in different ways. Both interpreting and translation require someone who has a certain love of language and deep knowledge of more than one language.